Window Glass Divided Lites: SDL Versus GBG

divided-lite

History, differences and what’s best for your home

The divided lite goes back hundreds of years to the first glass windows. Windows didn’t always have glass. Prior to this, they were just openings.

The original divided lites were individual panes of glass held in by mullions. Glass production was in its infancy so it could only be produced in pieces about the size of someone’s hand.

These glass panes then needed to be linked together to form a larger space. Muntins joined glass, thus the invention of the true divided lite. Muntins were originally made of cast iron but were replaced with wood in the early 1800s. Windows from this period are what would be considered a historic or traditional divided lite.

Glass becomes easier to produce

With the Industrial Revolution, glass production became easier and less expensive. Larger pieces of glass were produced. This meant the end of the true divided lite. However, the authentic look of divided lites was still desired then and now. Look at most homes today or even commercial buildings, and you’ll find some type of divided lite.

SDL versus GBG

With modern windows, there are two ways to achieve the divided lite look. Simulated divided lites (SDL) offer the most authentic look. SDLs are permanently adhered to both sides of the window with a narrow spacer bar within the insulating glass airspace. This look adds more depth. SDLs provide a bit more breadth in terms of options relating to shape and finishes.

Grilles between the glass (GBG) are as described, between the glass. The grille pattern is completely encased in the glass. This means less maintenance, as you won’t have to clean between all dividers. GBGs are also more budget friendly.

Ultimately, the use of SDLs or GBGs is a personal preference and depends on the type of look you want for your home.

Learn more about window options by viewing two of our popular window series: Siteline® wood windows and Premium™ Vinyl.

Sound Transmission Ratings: STC Versus OITC

Sound-Transmission-Ratings

When discussing sound transmission ratings for windows and doors, there are two different scales. In this post, we’ll look at Sound Transmission Class (STC) and Outdoor-Indoor Transmission Class (OITC) ratings and what they mean.

Sound Transmission Loss (TL)

A door’s ability to reduce noise is called its TL effectiveness. TL is a decibel value, determined by measuring sound pressure levels and certain frequencies. It also accounts for reverberation time (the length of time required for sound to decay 60 decibels from its initial level). The higher the TL, the better the door or window is at reducing noise transmission.

STC

Because TL ratings are based on a range of frequencies, it’s hard to know how accurate they are. STC ratings provide a single value of the acoustic performance of a door. STC is a weighted average of TL values over 16 frequencies. The higher the STC value, the better the performance.

We can divide STCs for interior doors into groupings:

  • STC 40-60: Best (loud sounds or speech heard faintly)
  • STC 25-40: Better (loud speech heard fairly well)
  • STC 20-25: Good (low speech audible)

Sound transmission ratings: The difference between STC and OITC

OITC is much newer than STC, originating in 1990. It also emphasizes the transmission of street sounds (horns, sirens, airplanes) through exterior walls, windows and façade elements. STC doesn’t focus on specific kinds of sounds, only how they transmitted through walls, doors and windows. OITC is not universally adopted, so STC ratings are still more prevalent.

Professionals have been using the STC rating system to measure sound transmission for decades. Originally evaluating transmission through interior walls only, you can use STC to assess almost any type of barriers: exterior walls, interior walls, windows and doors.

Exterior noise tends to be a lower frequency than interior noise (such as voices), so the OITC rating system emphasizes low-frequency sounds in its calculations. Professionals use OITC less frequently than the STC.

How OITC is measured

Like the STC rating System, OITC measures sound intensity loss in decibels. If a 105-decibel above-ground subway only registers as 80 decibels after traveling through a window, the sound experiences a 25-decibel deficit. The ability of a barrier to create a specific decibel deficit varies according to the frequency of the sound passing through it. In general, very high and very low frequency sounds are more difficult to block.

A barrier’s OITC rating is measured using data gathered over an 80 to 4000 hertz frequency range. After data collection, testers calculate the barrier’s OITC rating in accordance with standards laid out by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). Typically, a barrier’s OITC rating is lower than its STC rating.

What do STC and OITC ratings really mean

Ratings of sound transmission can be subjective. There are benchmarks that provide a standard platform for deciphering acoustic performance. Here are some examples:

2×4 exterior wall

A typical 2×4 wall with insulation in a stick-built home has an STC rating of around 36. Unless the entire structure is engineered for sound control, there is little value to purchasing windows with a higher rating than the wall. If the windows rate higher than the wall, sound enters the structure through the walls. Additionally, if the structure is old and not well-designed, sound-control windows may do little to nothing to improve the situation.

Single-pane windows

Existing single-pane windows often have an STC rating between 18 and 20. Replacing old single-pane units with new acoustic windows will likely have a noticeable effect.

Dual-pane windows

New dual-pane windows with standard glass fall in the STC 25-27 range. In many situations, this can reduce sound by as much as 40 percent when replacing single-pane windows with dual-pane. High-noise environments may require higher ratings.

When building or remodeling a space, it’s important to consider how sound will travel and where the weak spots might be. By looking at STC and OITC ratings, you can choose the windows and doors that best fit your needs.

Learn more about JELD-WEN products’ sound transmission ratings by reviewing our Technical Acoustic Documents.

Windows 101: Window Glass Options Guide

window-glass

Glass is an important part of windows and patio doors. There are multiple window glass options to fit the needs of the environment and climate. We’ve gathered all the glass options offered in JELD-WEN products in this handy guide.

LoĒ³-366® glass

A high performing glass with insulating argon gas, LoĒ³-366 helps homes stay cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Use of this glass can help windows qualify as ENERGY STAR® products. This glass allows light in but not heat. The view is also clearer compared to a tinted glass. It also protects against fading of interior furnishings by blocking up to 95 percent of the sun’s ultraviolet rays.

The glass is manufactured using a sputter coating process and contains a third layer of silver coating.

Neat® glass

Neat glass was developed to be virtually self-cleaning. It works as a coating that allows for easier cleaning. It uses the sun’s UV rays to loosen dirt so water can rinse it away. The titanium dioxide layer reacts chemically with the sun’s UV rays and causes organic materials that are on the glass to decompose.

It works on cloudy days as well. Up to 80 percent of UV radiation gets through cloud cover. A thin layer of silicon dioxide creates an ultra-smooth surface. Because all the microscopic peaks and valleys have been filled in, debris can slide off windows during rain. Water disperses evenly and rolls off, reducing water spotting.

Preserve® glass

This protective window film keeps windows safe and clean during construction. It also protects from scratching. Preserve is applied to both outer and inner surfaces in overlapping layers. It eliminates the issue of “ghosting” labels leaving imprints. It also helps crews work around windows without the concern of damage or the time to wrap and secure windows.

The coating peels off in one smooth motion. It contains no harmful chemicals and requires no special disposal.

It’s a fantastic way to save time and protect valuable materials.

Tinted glass

Tinted glass reduces glare. It’s ideal for areas that receive a lot of direct sunlight. Tints available include green, bronze, reflective gray and reflective bronze.

Insulated glass

High-performance Low-E glass combined with advanced spacer systems and gas sealed between the panes are key elements that provide an energy efficient window. Options include double-pane and triple-pane. A double-pane has an intercept spacer. Triple-panes have super spacers.

Textured glass

Textured glass gives you the opportunity to let light in while maintaining privacy. Many options are available including these five choices: Glue Chip, Rain, Obscure, Narrow Reed and Seedy Reamy.

Laminated glass

Laminated glass consists of panes of glass with an invisible interlayer, sandwiched together to create an extremely sturdy glass unit. This provides increased protection for home safety and from incidental impact. It also provides an improved barrier against sound and harmful UV rays.

Tempered glass

This type of glass is treated with heat, so it can withstand greater force or pressure on its surface. It also will not break into sharp pieces.

ImpactGard®

This glass stands up to strong impacts from windborne debris as well as harsh coastal conditions. It’s the industry’s leading laminated glass technology that can withstand a nine-pound piece of lumber striking it head-on at approximately 34 miles per hour. It also reduces sound transmission, blocks up to 95 percent of harmful UV rays and enhances home security.

Safe impact-resistance

During a severe storm, a broken window can affect a home’s structural integrity. Windows and patio doors with ImpactGard glass are designed to resist impact. Even if the glass cracks, the fragments will adhere to the interlayer, so the shards remain within the frame. ImpactGard protection also meets the nation’s toughest building codes. These codes specify that windows must withstand a nine-pound 2×4 traveling at 50-feet per second (34 miles per hour).

Secure forced-entry resistance

Windows and patio doors with ImpactGard glass resist forced entry. Because the interlayer separating the panes helps resist a potential intruder’s glass cutter, break-ins are less likely.

Learn more about our window offerings by browsing our complete line, which includes wood, vinyl and aluminum.

Seven Steps to the Find the Perfect Windows

find-the-perfect-windows

JELD-WEN offers many material, style, color, size and option possibilities for windows. There are hundreds of ways to configure your windows. Follow these seven steps to find the perfect windows for your home.

Step One: Choose the material

Window materials include wood, vinyl and aluminum. Each material has its own advantages and disadvantages. Material considerations should include: environment and climate, style of home and budget. Here’s a brief overview of all three materials:

Aluminum

  • Lightweight yet strong
  • Budget friendly
  • Corrosion resistant
  • Works well in most climates
  • Less options

Vinyl

  • Plastic material
  • Durable
  • Energy efficient
  • Budget friendly
  • Rarely fades or chips

Wood

  • Insulator and can aide with energy efficiency
  • Many options for staining and painting
  • When made with AuraLast®, provides protection against wood rot, water damage and termites
  • Very customizable
  • More maintenance than other materials
  • Renewable resource

Clad-Wood

  • Strong layer of metal on wood
  • Protection to wood
  • No exterior painting required
  • Low-maintenance option

Step Two: Decide on the type of window

Start with the basic shape and operation of the window or patio door. How will you use the window? What type of furniture will sit near or against the windows?

Awning

  • Hinged at the top to open outward
  • Often placed above doors
  • Great accent windows
  • Provide light and ventilation

Bays and bows

  • Creates more space
  • Bay windows extend a room outward
  • Bow windows create a gentle angle

Casement

  • Hinged on either the left or right
  • Opens wide for maximum ventilation
  • Frequently used in kitchens and bathrooms

Double-hung

  • Two operating sashes, which slide vertically past each other

Fixed, radius and geometric

  • Non-operational windows
  • Available in many shapes and sizes
  • Often placed over doors or fireplaces

Sliding

  • Often placed over kitchen sinks
  • Option available that allows both sashes to slide

Single-hung

  • Lower sash slides vertically to open while the upper sash remains stationary

Tilt & turn

  • Hinged at the sides for full ventilation
  • Hinges at the bottom open, allowing breeze in while keeping rain out

Step Three: Choose your glass

Performance glass is an option as well as glass that is tinted, tempered or textured.

Performance Glass

LoĒ³-366® glass

A high performing glass with insulating argon gas, LoĒ³-366® helps homes stay cool in the summer and warm in the winter. Use of this glass can help windows be ENERGY STAR® certified. This glass allows light in but not heat. The view is also clearer compared to a tinted glass. It also protects against fading of interior furnishings by blocking up to 95 percent of the sun’s ultraviolet rays. The glass is manufactured using a sputter coating process and contains a third layer of silver coating.

Neat® glass

Neat® glass was developed to be virtually self-cleaning. It works as a coating that allows for easier cleaning. It uses the sun’s UV rays to loosen dirt so water can rinse it away. The titanium dioxide layer reacts chemically with the sun’s UV rays. This causes organic materials that are on the glass to decompose.

It works on cloudy days as well. Up to 80 percent of UV radiation gets through cloud cover. A thin layer of silicon dioxide creates an ultra-smooth surface. Because all the microscopic peaks and valleys have been filled in, debris can slide off windows during rain. Water disperses evenly and rolls off, reducing water spotting.

Preserve® glass

This protective window film keeps windows safe and clean during construction. It also protects from scratching. It is applied to both outer and inner surfaces in overlapping layers. This application eliminates the issue of “ghosting” labels leaving imprints. It helps crews work around windows without the concern of damage.

The coating peels off in one smooth motion. It contains no harmful chemicals and requires no special disposal. It’s a fantastic way to save time and protect valuable materials.

Other glass options

  • Tinted glass reduces glare. It’s ideal for areas that receive a lot of direct sunlight. Tints available include green, bronze, reflective gray and reflective bronze.
  • Textured glass gives you the opportunity to let light in while maintaining privacy. Many options are available including these five choices: Glue Chip, Rain, Obscure, Narrow Reed and Seedy Reamy.
  • This type of glass is treated with heat, so it can withstand greater force or pressure on its surface. It also will not break into sharp pieces.

Step Four: Interior and exterior options

You can customize and personalize your windows with interior and exterior options.

For vinyl, you can choose:

  • Frame options: flush, integral nail fin, pocket, flat casing or retrofit brickmould
  • Interior and exterior finishes: multiple colors for interior and exterior; interior finish can be woodgrain

Wood windows offer many options as well, including interior and exterior finishes and trim.

Step Five: Hardware

Window hardware allows for another touch of personal style. It’s also necessary for security. Depending on the type of window, there may be multiple options for how the window locks and opens. Different finishes are available as well.

Step Six: Add architectural interest with divided lites and decorative grilles

Grilles and divided lites adds character to a window. Depending on the style of the home, you may want to use certain designs. For example, prairie grilles are a hallmark of Craftsman style whereas colonial grilles are considered Farmhouse. The prairie and colonial describe the design of the grille but also, it’s important to consider how the grilles should be inserted.

Simulated Divided Lines (SDL)

  • Grilles are adhered to the interior glass
  • Exterior grille options include aluminum for clad wood or wood for primed wood
  • Optional light brown or silver shadow bars are placed between the two panes of insulating glass to complete the effect
  • Interior and exterior SDLs are available in decorative beaded or subtle putty profiles (shown to the right)

Grilles Between the Glass (GBG)

  • Select 5/8″ flat or 23/32″ or 1″ contour metal grilles in many of our clad colors
  • Minimal maintenance option

Full-Surround (FS) wood grilles

  • Easily removed for cleaning
  • Choose from 7/8″, 1-1/8″ or 1-3/8″ grilles
  • Positioned on the interior glass surface

Precise Simulated Divided Lites (PDL)

  • Wood exterior bars, wood interior bars and an internal metal shadow bar
  • Interior and exterior bars are designed with identical widths and are permanently adhered to the glass
  • Available only on Custom wood exterior windows

Step Seven: Screen technology

Screens offer design and ventilation options, beautiful views and no bugs.

Phantom Screens®

These retractable screens provide wide-open views when you want them or breezy protection from the outdoors when you need it. They’re durable and easy to operate. Phantom Screens® are available on awning, casement and double-hung windows. Screens for double-hung windows also have a removable track that allows the sash to tilt in for easy cleaning.

BetterVue®

Today’s screen options are capable of much more than keeping out insects. With a fine, black fiberglass mesh and light gloss finish, BetterVue® insect screens do a beautiful job of keeping insects away.

Did you realize there were so many options for your windows? We offer a world of possibilities so you find the perfect windows for your home. Windows shouldn’t be an afterthought whether with a new build or renovation. Learn more about JELD-WEN windows – possibility awaits!

Windows 101: Window Cleaning Tips for the Best View

window-cleaning-tips

Did you know there is actually a right way to clean windows? Depending on the type of window and the debris on the interior or exterior, there are best practices. Many think all it takes is some cleaner in a spray bottle and a roll of paper towels. You may be disappointed after you use this method, as it usually just moves the dirt around. Because you want your windows looking great inside and out, here are some window cleaning tips for the best view.

What kind of cleaning solution should you use?

There are lots of window cleaning products available for purchase. But you can also make your own. To create a “soapy” cleaning solution you can use dish detergent or baby shampoo mixed with water. One tablespoon of the soap per gallon of water should suffice.

What tools do you need?

Depending on the size of the window and if you are dealing with individual panes, you can use a strip applicator (larger areas) or sponge (smaller areas). You will also need a squeegee to remove the soap, and a lint-free cloth to wipe dry.

Window cleaning steps:

  1. Create your cleaning solution in your bucket.
  2. Dip the strip applicator or sponge in the soap and squeeze out excess.
  3. Scrub the glass thoroughly. Remember to get the edges.
  4. Use the squeegee to remove the soap. Moving horizontally works best. Start at the top and work your way down. Apply it at an angle and overlap at least 2″ with each new swipe. As you use the squeegee, clean between swipes with the lint-free rag.
  5. After you finish with the squeegee, wipe all excess water with the lint-free rag. Don’t forget corners.
  6. Wipe sills with a separate cloth to collect any residue or dust.

You can use this method on the interior and exterior.

Stubborn stains

Some stains or debris won’t come off with regular cleaning. You can try a product with oxalic acid. It’s a powder that can be made into a paste. Apply the paste then rinse. To prevent future stains, you can use a protectant.

To make cleaning even easier, we recommend the use of Neat® glass, which was developed to be virtually self-cleaning. It works as a coating that allows for easier cleaning. Learn more about all our glass options.

Cleaning windows regularly is part of the overall care and maintenance. To view complete Care and Maintenance documents, click below on the type of windows you have:

Aluminum Windows and Patio Doors

Vinyl Windows and Patio Doors

Wood Windows and Patio Doors